How To Format a Two-Page Resume (And When You Actually Need One)

Not sure how to format a two-page resume — or whether you even need one? This guide has you covered, with details on what to include and resume examples.

a day ago   •   7 min read

By Rohan
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If a one-page resume is good, that makes a two-page resume twice as good, right?

Unfortunately, no. A two-page resume can be effective … if you need one. Generally, that means people applying for C-level, executive, or other very senior positions — most entry or mid-level job seekers should stick to a standard one-page resume instead.

If you’re looking for your next executive role, here’s how to format your two-page resume — including tips on what sections to add, what order they should go in, and more tips for formatting an executive resume.

How to format a 2-page resume

2-page resume template

Here’s an example of a two-page executive resume format:

Sample template for a 2-page resume format
Sample template for a 2-page resume format

For more templates, check out our C-level and executive resume templates, which you can download in Google Docs or PDF format.

If you’re wondering if your resume should be one page or two, upload it to the tool below — it’ll evaluate your resume and give you feedback on resume length and other key areas such as resume margins, font size and style, and spacing.

Example of a two-page resume format

As in the example above, you should format your two-page resume sections in this order:

Now, let’s go into a little more detail about what to include in each of those sections.

What to include in a 2-page resume

A two-page resume isn’t just the same as a one-page resume, only longer. Here’s what a good two-page resume should include, including standard resume sections as well as additional sections to include on an executive resume.

Every resume should include these basics:

Contact information

This section is no different on a two-page resume. Include your name, general location, phone number, email address, and (optionally) a link to your portfolio or LinkedIn profile.

Contact information to include on the first page of a 2-page resume
Contact information to include on the first page of a 2-page resume

Work experience

This is the most important part of any resume, and that goes double for a two-page resume. Not only can your work experience section be longer on a two-page resume, it can also be formatted differently. If you have extensive experience, consider splitting up your bullet points into core competencies with their own subheadings, for example, Revenue Growth, Mergers & Acquisitions, and Diversity & Inclusion.

Example of splitting 2-page resume bullet points into core competencies

You may also want to include a short blurb above your bullet points to quickly contextualize key elements of the role, for example, the scope of the business or the size of the department you led.

Adding a short blurb underneath your job title can provide additional context for a recruiter
Adding a short blurb underneath your job title can provide additional context for a recruiter

Education

In contrast to your work experience, additional sections like education should be shortened on a two-page resume. Include the name of the school and degree, location, and your major and relevant minor(s). At this stage, you can leave off details like your GPA, coursework, student activities, and even your graduation date.

Keep your education section short and simple on a 2-page resume
Keep your education section short and simple on a 2-page resume

Skills

In a two-page resume, you can still include a short section at the bottom that lists technical skills, languages, certifications, awards, and other information. You can title this “Skills” or “Core competencies.” Consider splitting this section into key areas using subheadings to highlight specific competencies and make your resume easier to skim.

If you want to find technical skills related to the executive/management role you’re applying for, use the tool below to get a list of relevant skills and keywords. The tool also gives you the option to upload your resume. It’ll perform a quick scan and tell you what skills are missing.

Use subheadings to highlight core competencies in the skills section of a 2-page resume
Use subheadings to highlight core competencies in the skills section of a 2-page resume

In addition to the above, here are some additional sections you might want to include on a two-page resume:

Resume title

This can go at the top of your resume and should match the exact title of the job you’re applying for. This can help your resume pass the initial screening stage, especially if you’ve done similar work previously but under a slightly different job title. In addition, you can add select keywords underneath to highlight your top areas of expertise, similar to a LinkedIn headline.

Use keywords in your 2-page resume title
Use keywords in your 2-page resume title

Executive summary

Unlike a standard one-page resume, where it’s optional, an executive summary is a must for a two-page resume. This puts your most relevant experience together upfront, where it’s impossible to miss. Include a brief overview of your experience plus a few key accomplishments in bullet points.

Emphasize career highlights in an executive summary
Emphasize career highlights in an executive summary

Areas of expertise

No, this isn’t just a fancy name for a skills section. An areas of expertise section goes at the top of your resume, underneath the executive summary, and should include a high-level overview of your broad areas of expertise rather than specific technical skills.

List broad competencies in an areas of expertise section
List broad competencies in an areas of expertise section

Additional sections

You can choose to cover one or two additional areas in your two-page resume, including volunteer work, projects, certifications, board memberships, and professional affiliations. Don’t feel the need to list all of these — instead, choose 1-2 that are most relevant to your experience and the job you’re applying for. For example, a projects section might be a good idea for work that requires programming or design skills, while board memberships and professional affiliations can emphasize that you’re well-regarded in your particular field.

Include 1-2 additional sections in a 2-page resume
Include 1-2 additional sections in a 2-page resume

For even more tips on how to format a 2-page resume, why not check out our definitive 2022 guide on how to write an executive resume?

When should you use a 2-page resume?

When to use a 2-page resume

You should use a two-page resume format if:

  • You have 10-15 years+ experience
  • You’re applying for very senior or executive roles
  • You need one — on other words, if you actually have enough relevant information to warrant 2 pages

When not to use a 2-page resume

Most job seekers won’t need a two-page resume. In most cases, recruiters expect a single page, but won’t automatically reject you if your resume spills over onto a second page. That said, you should stick to a standard one-page resume if:

  • You’re a student, recent graduate, or entry-level job seeker
  • You need to add extraneous information (“fluff”) to fill out a second page

Formatting a 2-page resume: The finer details

Wondering about the nitty-gritty of how to format a two-page resume? Here are your questions, answered.

How long should each section be?

Like in any resume, your professional experience should take up the bulk of the space. This means that the work experience section on a two-page resume could take up a whole page by itself.

The longer your work experience section is, the shorter other sections should be. This is especially true of your education section — on a two-page resume, your education should only take up a couple of lines.

This is completely optional! If you use a resume header, it should include the same information as your contact information — your name, phone number, email address, and portfolio or LinkedIn details. Even so, always include that information at the top of the first page of your resume in addition to in your resume header.

If you do include a resume header or footer, use the actual header function on Word or Google Docs rather than adding the information manually in small font. This looks more polished and professional and makes it clear that you haven’t just accidentally added duplicate information.

Should you include resume page numbers?

Indicating the page number of your resume is also optional. If you do want to add resume page numbers, include them in your resume header or footer rather than simply writing a number at the bottom of the page.

What margins, fonts, and text size should you use?

These should all be the same as in a standard one-page resume — see our guide on resume margins and other formatting tips for more details. Generally, this means using one-inch margins on all sides, standard fonts, and consistent formatting across all pages of your resume.

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